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Character Creation Character Advancement - Example Character Sheets - Quick Start
System Stuff Skill List - Class List - Permissions List - Stunts List
GM Information Bestiary - Random Injury Table - Worldbuilding
Classes
Battle Cunning Thought Charm
Fighter Rogue Scholar Diplomat
Barbarian Assassin Sage Spy
Knight Gleeman Tactician Chevalier
Sorcerer Druid Summoner Namer
Monster Enchanter Abjurer Priest
Warrior Monk Ranger Wizard Skald
Specialist Classes
Soldier Thief Mage Leader
Martial Artist Wanderer Loremaster Performer

What is FATE Spin?

FATE Spin is a tabletop game, like Dungeons & Dragons or Pathfinder. A group of friends sit down together to play a game with certain rules. One person chooses to be the Game Master (GM), while the others create characters to play. Together they create and explore a fantasy world filled with adventure, magic, and monsters. See the How to Play section for how to get started.

For Experienced Tabletop Players

FATE Spin is an overhaul for the FATE Core Tabletop RPG system with a focus on swords-and-sorcery combat. It takes some of the best parts of the original system and mixes them with concepts from other tabletop fantasy games. The system is designed to be a middle ground between rule-based systems (like Pathfinder or d20 Modern) and narrative-based systems (like FATE and Dungeon World). Its goal is to be something that fans of both groups can enjoy, while still being accessible to new players.

Why is FATE Spin?

The FATE Core system is a powerful and versatile tool for running tabletop games. It has been successfully adapted to a number of settings, including the popular Dresden Files RPG. That said, the FATE system isn't everyone's cup of tea. Gamers that prefer more detailed rulesets tend to find FATE's open-ended mechanics less enjoyable, and new players can be overwhelmed by sheer variety of options.

FATE Spin attempts to strike a balance between freedom and prescription, giving players more stringent guidelines for play while still maintaining the flexibility that's made FATE popular. A few highlights include:

  • Simplified Character Creation
  • Classes Inspired by D&D and Pathfinder
  • Fantasy Skill List
  • Streamlined Aspect System
  • Strategic Combat
  • Reduced GM Workload

Veterans of FATE can go here for a specific list of differences from FATE Core.

GM's can go here for an explanation of why various changes were made.